“Andrew has experience across a range of disputes from high-value Commercial Court claims to statutory demands and pre-action advisory work. He has particular experience in civil fraud disputes and applications for interim freezing injunctions”.

Andrew trained at Allen & Overy between 2016 and 2018 and joined Cooke, Young & Keidan upon qualification as a solicitor in March 2018. During his time at Allen & Overy, Andrew gained experience in the general corporate and commercial litigation department, where he worked with some of the market leading lawyers on a variety of disputes including contractual claims, professional negligence claims, judicial review and arbitration. Andrew also gained experience in the funds and debt capital markets departments, and spent six months in Dubai working on both conventional bond and Islamic sukuk transactions.

Since joining Cooke, Young & Keidan, Andrew has gained significant High Court litigation experience during the CMOC case (see Cases of Note below). This included working as the lead associate on the investigation and litigation of a payment of the client’s stolen funds into the UK. He has since worked on other substantial disputes and is rapidly developing his experience as a commercial disputes lawyer.

Background

Andrew read Law and French at Trinity College, Dublin where he was elected a Scholar of the College. He then attended Harvard Law School on a Fulbright Scholarship and completed further postgraduate education at Trinity College, Dublin while delivering seminars and co-ordinating the mooting programme at the Law School.

Andrew has volunteered for a number of pro bono causes, including Irish Travellers’ rights, LGBTQI rights, asylum and access to justice.

Professional groups

Member of the Law Society of England and Wales, Junior Lawyers’ Division
Junior London Solicitors Litigation Association
InterLaw Diversity Forum

Languages

French (intermediate)
Irish (written)


Cases of Note

  • Acting for three individuals in the defence of a £40m claim made against them in the Commercial Court for deceit, conspiracy to deceive and breach of fiduciary duties in connection with their successful management buy-out of a technology company.

  • CMOC v Persons Unknown [2017], acting for international commodities business subject to a sophisticated Business Email Compromise fraud. Obtained first-known reported worldwide freezing injunction against ‘Persons Unknown’.